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"I'm using the power of podcasting to connect the dots between the global efforts to fight malaria"
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Thomas Locke
Co-Founder

PODCASTS

Facing the Brunt of Malaria

Facing the Brunt of Malaria

Malaria: FAQs

Here are the answers to most commonly asked questions about malaria.

Malaria is an infectious disease transmitted by mosquitoes. It is most prevalent in Africa, where greater than 90% of cases occur. There are several types of malaria that infect humans; the two most common being P. falciparum and P. vivax.

Malaria is caused by the single-celled Plasmodium parasites that require both the mosquito and human host to complete their lifecycle. 

Malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes. However, only the Anopheles mosquito, and only females of that genus, can transmit the disease.

The initial symptoms of malaria can be similar to that of the common cold; shaking, chills, fever, sweating and headache. If not treated promptly, the disease can quickly lead to more serious health complications and even death.

Once diagnosed a malaria infection can be treated using antimalarial drugs. Malaria infection can also be prevented from occurring by taking drugs before you are bitten by a malaria infected mosquito. For example, travellers to malaria endemic areas will be advised to take drugs before, during and after their trip.

In Africa, in areas of high transmission, children under the age of 5 are given a monthly dose of antimalarial during the malaria season. This is known as seasonal malaria chemoprevention.

Currently, there is no publicly available vaccine against malaria. However, the malaria vaccine RTS,S is undergoing pilot implementation trials in Africa which started 2019.

Malaria: FAQs

Here are the answers to most commonly asked questions about malaria.

Malaria is an infectious disease transmitted by mosquitoes. It is most prevalent in Africa, where greater than 90% of cases occur. There are several types of malaria that infect humans; the two most common being P. falciparum and P. vivax.


Malaria is caused by the single-celled Plasmodium parasites that require both the mosquito and human host to complete their lifecycle. 

Malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes. However, only the Anopheles mosquito, and only females of that genus, can transmit the disease.

The initial symptoms of malaria can be similar to that of the common cold; shaking, chills, fever, sweating and headache. If not treated promptly, the disease can quickly lead to more serious health complications and even death.

Once diagnosed a malaria infection can be treated using antimalarial drugs. Malaria infection can also be prevented from occurring by taking drugs before you are bitten by a malaria infected mosquito. For example, travellers to malaria endemic areas will be advised to take drugs before, during and after their trip.

In Africa, in areas of high transmission, children under the age of 5 are given a monthly dose of antimalarial during the malaria season. This is known as seasonal malaria chemoprevention.

Currently, there is no publicly available vaccine against malaria. However, the malaria vaccine RTS,S is undergoing pilot implementation trials in Africa which started 2019.

Educational Resources

A series of educational resources to raise awareness of the disease.

Educational Resources

A series of educational resources to raise awareness of the disease.

Before you go...

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